Life on the Ocean Waves
2013 © Copyright Debbie King. All rights reserved.
Artemis Braemar Arcadia M/S Queen Victoria Queen Victoria in Rotterdam on her Maiden Voyage in December 2007
Queen Victoria vital statistics Company: Cunard Home Port: Hamilton, Bermuda Gross Tonnage: 90,000 tons Cruising Speed: 18 knots Passenger Capacity: 2,014 Passenger Decks: 12 Built: 2007 Voyages sailed on this ship: North Sea, (2007) British Isles (2015)
Queen Victoria - We were lucky enough to get a place on the QV’s Maiden Voyage.  For the first time in history, there were three 'Queens' sailing under the Cunard flag, the other two being Queen Elizabeth 2 and Queen Mary 2. Unlike the previous Queens, however, M/S Queen Victoria is a cruise ship rather than an ocean liner.  Nonetheless she is absolutely opulent, as the photos on this page will testify.  We left Southampton on 11 December 2007 for a 10-day voyage around the Northern European Christmas markets. Click on the small photos to open a larger picture in its own window, and don’t forget to take a look at my gallery for more photos of this unique voyage. Read my 2015 review on CruiseCritic.co.uk.
Cabin 1040 on the Queen Victoria The elegant Queen's Room on the Queen Victoria Lobby and Grand Staircase on the Queen Victoria
We were allocated stateroom 1040 on Deck 1.  We decided against a stateroom with a balcony this time as we didn't think we would be sitting outside in the North Sea in December! We had been listening to the shipping forecast on Radio 4 each day and were expecting gales, rain and high seas.  However, it was one of the calmest, smoothest voyages I have ever experienced. True to Cunard's exceptional quality, the stateroom was spacious and comfortable and we were met with the usual bottle of champagne on ice :-)
The Queen's Room ballroom.  This is a really elegant room, large and high-ceilinged with a mezzanine floor.  Each evening passengers congregated here after dinner to dance to a live orchestra.  Themed evenings included a black-and-white evening and a masquerade ball. In addition, Cunard World Club members such as Trevor and I gathered here for cocktails with the captain.  There were also classical piano recitals and it was so pleasant and relaxing to sip on champagne and listen to the lovely music.
Whilst the QM2 remains the flagship of Cunard White Star line, many people will say that the Queen Victoria is, in many ways, more luxurious.  Certainly no expense seems to have been spared on her decor and furnishings. Here we see the double staircase in the Grand Lobby, reminiscent of the Grand Staircase on board the Titanic.  I always felt like a film star sweeping down the stairs in my ball gown on formal nights!  It was also a great setting for a photograph.
Leaning over the stern of the QV at sea She wears her name with pride Some of the amazing artwork on board the QV
The Queen Victoria at sea.  This photo was taken leaning right over the railing at the stern (lucky we didn't fall in!) in order to capture the name of the ship and her home port. It was quite bracing in the December air to take a stroll on deck but exhilarating at the same time.  The QV has a couple of outdoor swimming pools as well as jacuzzis which maintained a temperature of 34°C, but not many were brave enough to enter the water!
The Queen Victoria is painted in the traditional Cunard colours of black and white hull and red funnel.
A stunning 3D portrayal of the QV at the top of one of the staircases.
Cabin 4119 on Queen Victoria Queen Victoria next to Annie Moore statue, Cobh Queen Victoria in Cobh, Ireland in May 2015
Cabin 4119, our “home” for a week during our Lusitania Remembered” voyage in May 2015.  the cabin was spacious and comfortable, but the view out of the window was largely obscured by a lifeboat.
Queen Victoria in Cobh, next to the statue of Annie Moore and her brothers.  Annie Moore was the first Irish emigrant to be processed at Ellis Island, New York, in 1892.
The Queen Victoria in Cobh, Ireland - 100 years to the day after the sinking of another great Cunard liner, the RMS Lusitania.